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Qualifications Needed To Become A Vet

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 By Chris Moresby

To become a vet, one needs more than a profound love of animals, although its importance cannot be discounted. After all, a vet spends most of his career caring for our four-legged (and some two-legged) friends. However, just affection won’t help serve animals when their health or lives are at stake. After all, a vet is responsible for the prevention of disease and for the medical and surgical treatment of animals, and it requires a lot of training and hard work to gain this expertise.

The Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (RCVS) is the governing body of vets in the country. Under the provisions of the Veterinary Surgeons Act of 1966, with certain minor exceptions, only a registered veterinary surgeon is permitted to diagnose and treat injuries and ailments of animals. In order to be granted membership of the RCVS, an aspiring vet will have to go to university and take a veterinary degree. The UK universities offering veterinary degrees approved by the RCVS are Bristol, Glasgow, Liverpool, Cambridge, Edinburgh and London (the Royal Veterinary College). The courses are usually five years in length (six years at some schools). The Nottingham University has also started a new veterinary school. Applications are made through the Universities & College Admissions Service (UCAS).

There are also a number of overseas degrees from Australia, New Zealand and South Africa which are approved by RCVS. Graduates from North American schools accredited by the American Veterinary Medical Association can also apply for membership to the RCVS. Holders of many European degrees are also eligible to register with RCVS if they are EU citizens. Seats at the veterinary degree courses are highly sought after and have stringent requirements for admission. These include a strong academic record as represented by the following: A Levels Biology must usually be offered at A level. The requirement for other subjects varies a little from university to university, but either one or two subjects from Chemistry, Physics or Mathematics should be offered. Some universities may accept a third A level in a non-science subject, but it must be an academically sound subject. The minimum grades generally expected are two A’s and a B, though some schools will require three grade A’s.

AS Levels Some universities accept AS levels, but specific requirements can vary. Sometimes, two AS levels will be accepted instead of one A level, except in Chemistry where a full A level is usually required.

SCE Highers Chemistry must be offered as well as two subjects from Biology, Physics or Mathematics. The grades generally expected are AAABB.

Advanced Highers Applicants are normally advised to proceed to the Sixth Year and include CSYS Chemistry and Biology or Physics in their subjects.

GCSE The applicant must meet the general entrance requirements of the university. Most universities require an applicant to have at least a grade C pass in English Language, Mathematics and Science, and many will expect A grades at GCSE. Where A level Biology or Physics is not offered, the candidate must have a good pass in that subject at GCSE level. Vocational Qualifications Applicants with certain vocational qualifications relevant to the study area, such as the BTEC Diploma in Animal Science, with distinction grades, may be considered by certain schools. In addition to academic excellence, the admission committees lay great stress on practical work experience. The applicant must show his interest in this field by prior work at a veterinary practice or a similar establishment, handling pets and farm animals. However, work experience cannot substitute academic credentials but can add to them.

Once the applicant receives his degree and registers with the RCVS, he can practise in the country as a qualified vet. If he wants to specialise in any particular field, further study is required to gain an additional diploma. 

About the author:

Find our more about how to <a target=”_blank” href=”http://www.ashford-vets.co.uk“>become a vet</a> at <a target=”_blank” href=”http://www.ashford-vets.co.uk“>www.ashford-vets.co.uk</a>

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Filed under: Applications, Career Path, Career Search, Graduate School, Major, Universities, , , , , ,

Photography Schools – Which One To Choose?

By James Hunaban

There is a lot of choice when it comes to places where you can learn photography, but which would be the best for you? For sure there are plenty of online learning resources, but you will not get that practical experience you need. You will learn a lot more being with other students and a good teacher. Having said that, online information is good at getting the basics down, and is a good place to start.

What exactly you require from a photography class will help you decide which one to go for. For example, a college which is not just for photography will only offer basic levels. If you only intend taking up photography as a hobby then the basic levels of instruction will probably suffice.

If you really want to take your photography seriously you should go for a school or college which specializes in it. These specialized schools will probably employ a professional which should really help you learn the specifics and expand your know-how.

You must decide what it is you exactly want from your photography, once you have decided that you can choose your school or college and set about applying for a course. Do your online research and try to find any local courses or even courses further afield.

You may need to take specialized classes in basic disciplines such as lighting, composition and various other basic routines. Portrait photography, for example requires an understanding of light, angles, balances, and will teach you how to get the reactions you want from your subject. The digital photography world requires the understanding of several different techniques that were not required when using the older type of film camera.

As you get into it and really start learning all the ins and outs you may decide that you would like a career in photography. There is a lot of help both online and off-line if this is the path you choose.

One specialized area of photography is taking photographs under water. Most normal schools and colleges do not cater for this and you may have to do a bit of searching to find one which specializes in it. Underwater photography would make for a fascinating hobby or even better, a profession. To me, the underwater world is more interesting than the world above it.

About the author:
For an abundance of Digital SLR Camera user reviews please visit – http://dslrreviews.net/

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Filed under: Campus Lifestyle, Career Path, Career Search, Classes, Major, Photography Schools, Students, , , , , , , , ,

College Planning Specialists TV Interview with Dan Evertsz

Dan Evertsz owner of BayCollegePlanners.com has the answers to the difficult questions parents and students face when considering the choices and expenses of a college education: “How do we find the money for college?” The following is an introduction to Dan and his Bay Area College Specialists consulting business in the form of a television interview on the Northern California Comcast show “Reference Point” with host Dave Korcharhook.

If you are having trouble qualifying for student aid, finding funding for an education, or if you are in need of consultation about these expenses please consider Dan Evertsz your go-to source for action:


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