Bay College Planning Specialists

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HOW CAN PARENTS OF COLLEGE BOUND STUDENTS ACCESS FREE MONEY FOR COLLEGE?

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This Way to Free Money for College

The cost of a college education is skyrocketing.  Other than the purchase of your home, a college education will be a family’s largest expense in their lifetime.  Is your family prepared to spend in excess of $100,000.00 for your kid’s college education?  I’ve listed a few tips that will help ease the pain if parents become proactive in the process.

Tip #1. Start the search for schools that are a good fit for your child.

Find schools that offer maximum financial aid.  Some are more generous based on their endowments.  Start with a list of 20 to 30 schools  and begin to research their aid history.  Some schools will help more than others.  A good place to start is with College Board’s website(www.collegeboard.com).

Tip #2.  Apply to schools at which  your student has a good chance of being admitted.

Grades and test scores should be in the top 25% of the application pool.  The higher your students GPA, test scores and more importantly, community service attributes, the better chance of admittance and endowment scholarship consideration.

Tip #3. Research the schools Merit Scholarship qualifications.

Merit scholarships are based overall talents of your student.  Family income is not a determining factor when qualifying for these types of awards.

Tip #4. Always complete the Free Application For Federal Student Aid.

You may be pleasantly surprised even if you are a six-figure family.  If you don’t apply for FAFSA, you will be ineligible for any type of federal aid including student loans as well as many merit scholarships.


Dan Evertsz, the College Money Pro, is the owner of College Planning Specialists located in Oakland, CA. For the past 17 years, he and his partner have helped of hundreds of families obtain financial aid from universities all across the country.

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Filed under: Admissions, Applications, Banks, College Debt, College Financing, College Planning, College Workshops, Essays, FAFSA, Grants, High School, Out of State Tuition, Pell Grants, Public Service, Scholarship, School supplies, Students, Tax Credits, Tuition, Universities, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

College Financial Aid – A Game of Strategy

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By Pete Becker

Every year, tens of millions of students and their parents struggle to complete the required FAFSA and CSS Profile forms. These forms are required if the family wants to receive financial aid. They ask for all kinds of personal, financial, and even religious information. It can be a very invasive process. What most parents don’t understand is that they are playing a Game conceived by the Federal Government and run by the colleges. Rarely do the colleges explain the rules in advance. In fact, this game is very much like a game of Poker.

For most people, the first few times they play a game, such as poker, someone explains the purpose and the rules to follow. They are helped until they understand and can play on their own. After a while, the new player may attempt to learn how to play the game well enough to win more of the time. If the player is really serious, they will seek out books, articles, and software to sharpen their skills. The strategies they learn will give them confidence in their abilities and they will start to win more often.

The College Financial Aid Game is different though. The rules of the game were created by Congress and the U.S. Department of Education. Each college gets to add in their own additional rules or change the rules to benefit that college. The game is aimed primarily at the parents. Where can they go to learn about the game? Playing this game means filling out the forms and pressing Submit. For most parents, there is only a once a year opportunity to play.

This game as I have described it is a lot like poker. Your cards are actually your income and your assets. The higher cards in a poker deck such as the Ace, King, Queen, and Jack are the equivalent of higher income and assets. Lower poker cards like 2, 3, and 4 represent lower income and assets.

In Poker, the hand with the highest cards at the end of the game wins all the time, except if you are good at bluffing. In the College Financial Aid Game, if the parents are holding high cards, they loose and the colleges win. The parents have to pay the colleges or will receive less in financial aid.

If the parents are holding or appear to be holding the low cards, they win. That means that the colleges will offer them a great deal in terms of financial aid, and this will include grants and scholarships. The key to playing this game is knowing the rules and learning the strategies that will make you appear as if you have low cards. This means knowing how to appear as if your income and assets are diminished.

The colleges do not play a friendly game. Their rules are tough. They are allowed to count your income and assets even in ways the IRS does not. For income, your Adjusted Gross Income is what counts. Your deductions and expenses are your problems. For assets, most are considered fair game. There are 153 different strategies that can be used to level the playing field for you.
When playing their game, it is in your best interest to learn the rules of their game and to learn the strategies that will help you to win!

About the author:
I have had a long career in financial products and small business. My new role is to educate high school parents on how best to prepare financially for college. As an introduction, I have just completed my brand new ebook which covers ten examples that colleges don’t want you to know about the process. It is “Secrets That Colleges Don’t Want You To Know”. Download it free at http://www.collegeplanningpathways.com

Filed under: Admissions, Applications, Banks, College Debt, College Financing, College Planning, College Workshops, Essays, FAFSA, Grants, High School, Out of State Tuition, Pell Grants, Public Service, Scholarship, School supplies, Students, Tax Credits, Tuition, Universities, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Which Loans for College Students?

By Owen Jones

moneyLet’s suppose that you have a teenager who will shortly be graduating from high school. You will feel happy naturally, the same as any other parent. whose child is passing out high school. It is one of those milestones in life that you have successfully circumnavigated, in spite of all the financial obstacles that you have probably experienced. It is time to be happy, for you have fulfilled your role of giving your child a brighter future.

But as most would say, a high school graduation is not the be all and end all. In deed, it is only the beginning of tougher challenges that await you and your child in the following years of college education.

At this moment, you need to begin thinking about how you will finance the courses of your college-bound teenager. With the increasing cost of tuition fees, you need to plan ahead well of time to avoid any problems, especially if you not well-off. I should imagine you already know how hard it is to have to cope with the increasing costs of your child’s high school education before. The earlier you start thinking about your child’s college education, the less you will have financial problems afterwards.

If you think you will ever be faced with financial issues again, it is vital that you know the different financial aid programs available for your college-bound child. Just keep reading to learn the financial aids that can help you:

A Grant: it is the first type of college financial aid that you should apply for. It only requires you to complete a FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) application form. Once the form has been sent, it will be checked and if
your child qualifies, he/she will get the full amount of what he/she has applied for. At this moment, you need not do anything much further except provide the name of the college or university that your teen wants to enrol into.

Scholarships: Although a scholarship is mostly intended for students who have the ‘brains’ but do not have the ‘money’, not all college scholarships are intended for academics. Students who do not have the best academic record can still qualify for many other college scholarships. There are college sports scholarships, community service work scholarships, social involvement scholarships and many others. These are only a few of the different types of scholarships for your child if he / she is not that academically talented.

‘Student Loans’: these kinds of loan have rather lower interest rates compared with other sorts of loan. Some loans are off-set, which means that the interest does not accumulate until a student finishes college. Moreover, these loans do not require collateral, and therefore, you do not have to worry about putting your own home up as collateral against the student loan for your child. Most of these loans are available on various repayment plans at low interest rates and low monthly installment payments.

If you haven’t yet started looking for any of the various financial aid programs available, it is advisable that you start now. These financial aids are there to help you and will provide the funds needed for your child’s college education. You can be free from worries about the cost of your teen’s education, if you begin early enough.

About the author:
If you want information on gettingcollege education funding then you really
should visit our website on applying for scholarships and grants

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Filed under: Admissions, College Debt, College Financing, College Planning, FAFSA, Grants, Parental Guidance, Pell Grants, Scholarship, School supplies, single mothers, single parent families, Students, Tuition, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

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